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The main focus of this site is rare TV DX. As such, some of the IDs are difficult to read. Often, weak TV DX does not produce quality photographs (or screen grabs), even if it is readable on video tape. (It also seems that, in the case of Televisa local IDs from Mexico, "TELEVISA" is generally readable, while calls and/or location might not be readable. And the "TV Azteca" logo, which is on the left side of local Azteca IDs, usually looks good in spite of how un-readable the text might be.)

Many of these pages were renovated in September and October, 2003. New photographs include rare TV IDs from Mexico states Chiapas, Guanajuato, Michoacan, Nayarit, and San Luis Potosi. The Mexico pages dsiplay IDs from twenty-four states and Mexico City, DF. More new photographs will be added as time permits.

In addition, veteran DXer Christopher S. Dunne has given me permission to display some of his rare IDs from Latin America TV stations.

The USA/Canada pages will be updated at a later date.

My IDs were recorded onto VHS videotape and photographed with a Canon AE-1 35mm camera or grabbed by a Snappy 4.0.

Thanks to my patient wife (who did much of the photography) and my son for their assistance with this project.



MY WORDS OF ADVICE FOR SUCCESSFUL TV DXING: LOCATION, LUCK, PATIENCE, PERSISTANCE

MY ADVICE ON TV ANTENNAS: BUY THE LARGEST ANTENNAS THAT YOU HAVE ROOM FOR OR THAT YOU CAN AFFORD.

MY BEST TIP FOR LOGGING MEXICO TV STATIONS: NEVER TURN THE VCR OFF, BECAUSE SUPERED LOCAL IDS CAN POP UP AT ANY TIME.

ANOTHER TIP LEARNED FROM THE SCHOOL OF HARD KNOCKS: ALWAYS RECORD YOUR DX ON TAPE, SO YOU CAN REVIEW QUESTIONABLE ID MATERIAL. THIS ALSO GIVES YOU A RECORD OF YOUR DX.

EQUIPMENT USED FOR TV DXING

Some DXers use thousands of dollars worth of equipment, while others use only a TV and antenna. I'm somewhere in between.

TVs, VCRs, and Camcorders: Many modern TVs and VCRs have weak signal mutes and "blue screens" that kick-in when the signal is weak. Camcorders do a better job of recording DX than VCRs, as they record whatever is on the TV screen. Unfortunately, today's TVs are generally less sensitive (weaker) than the ones made prior to the 1990s. I use various older models, along with some of the more-DX-suited later models. Three TVs and five VCRs (one for each Es channel) are employed during Es. I also have a Sony Handicam camcorder.

Antennas: Most of the best antennas have been discontinued by Channel Master (CM), Winegard, and Antennacraft. Of the several TV antennas in my arsenal, I'm currently using only two for VHF and one for UHF. An Antennacraft P-5 parabolic dish, covered with chicken wire for added gain, is used for UHF. My main VHF-only antenna is a Winegard CA-5254 (fifteen and one-half foot long boom) at eighteen feet above the ground. The other antenna is a Finco Y10-2 ten-element channel 2 yagi (fourteen foot boom length) at eleven feet above the ground.

Lead-in Cable: Belden 9011 RG-11 coaxial cable is used for the UHF dish and a seventy foot run to the channel 2 yagi. Belden 1189 RG-6QS is used on the CA-5254.

Rotators: Some DXers use stationary antennas aimed in one direction or "armstrong" rotors (turn the mast by hand). However, I use old CM 9510 Colorotors, CM 9515 HD Beam Masters, and Radio Shack 1225 Archerotors (none of which is available any longer). The control boxes on these rotors, unfortunately, are junk.

Preamp: A Winegard AP-4700 preamp is connected to the UHF dish.

Distribution Amp: The signal from the CA-5254 is split, with one-half going into a CM 3044 four-output DA.

Traps and Filters: Microwave Filter Company (MFC) brand traps are used (inside) to attenuate local TV stations and reduce RF interference from the band between channels 4 and 5.

Special Details: Although I use traps on my local channels 3 and 6, untrapped signals are fed to channels 3 and 6 VCRs in order to catch floaters and over-takers.


FIRST INTEREST IN BROADCASTING: I've been told, that as a toddler, my favorite TV program was the "Indian Head" test pattern. By the age of ten, I was interested in receiving "out of town" TV stations from this region when signals were enhanced by tropo.

YEAR BEGAN DXING: 1968

TYPES OF DXING INVOLVED IN OVER THE YEARS: Medium Wave (AM), Short Wave, FM, TV. Currently only TV.

ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIPS: In the past, National Radio Club (NRC) and International Radio Club of America (IRCA). Currently, Worldwide TV-FM DX Association (WTFDA) and British FM and TV Circle.

FIRST TV LOG BEGAN: 1968

CURRENT TV LOG BEGAN: 1994